Renee Gray: Homeless Military Veteran Has Hope

  • By New Beginnings Incorporation New Beginnings Transitional Services
  • 20 Dec, 2017

Rene Gray

Learn why Rene Gray joined the military and how there is a lack of opportunity and support from the country to help him deal with his homelessness. Growing up, Gray had to deal with his parents’ divorce and estranged father. Living through these hard times, he decided to try and make ends meet by joining the military.

 Gray came back to the civilian world after serving his time for several years and chose not to reenlist again with the feedback and plea of his family. Although Gray now has a job as a driver and some assistance from social workers, he still finds himself living in a homeless shelter while trying to help support his mother and sister.

 


By New Beginnings Incorporation New Beginnings Transitional Services 01 Jan, 2018

For Veterans with combat trauma the risk of misusing substances is very high. The desire to medicate the pain and anxiety associated with PTSD can become overpowering and even seen as necessary to function and sleep. Abusing substances increases the risk of veteran incarceration, homelessness, and suicide. It is the mission of New Beginnings Incorporation: New Beginnings Transitional Services to provide resources for substance abuse treatment and provide housing services to homeless veterans who struggle with substance abuse.


By New Beginnings Incorporation New Beginnings Transitional Services 01 Jan, 2018

United States Military Veteran Ernesto Jimenez served his time in the military several years ago and is now suffering from being homeless and coping with substance abuse. Jimenez has been looking for a way out for some time now. For many veterans like Ernesto, mental health issues and substance abuse are common obstacles to finding and securing stable housing options. There is a lack of support and affordable options for homeless military veterans like Jimenez.


By New Beginnings Incorporation New Beginnings Transitional Services 01 Jan, 2018

According to the Institute of Medicine, drug abuse among U.S. military personnel is so rampant it's considered a public health crisis. New Beginnings Incorporation: New Beginnings Transitional Services is a nonprofit charity that provides substance abuse treatment and housing services.


By New Beginnings Incorporation New Beginnings Transitional Services 20 Dec, 2017

There is no help for soldiers returning from military service. Homeless stats provided by the U.S. Housing and Urban Development reveal one in ten homeless adults was a military veteran, and that the fastest growing homeless population is military service personnel returning from the Wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.  New Beginnings Incorporation: New Beginnings Transitional Services is a nonprofit charity located in California and Nevada that provides services to homeless veterans.

By New Beginnings Incorporation New Beginnings Transitional Services 20 Dec, 2017

Stacey Thompson was proud to be a woman in the Marines. But after she reported being sexually assaulted by her sergeant she was given an "other than honorable" discharge that left her without military benefits. Struggling with PTSD, Stacey waged a decade-long battle to regain her health and military honors. The military eventually acknowledged its mistake and upgraded her discharge. The nonprofit charity, Mosaic art, and writing help Stacey work through her PTSD and share her experience with civilians. Now, she and her husband, also a Marine veteran, are proud of the life they have built through their journey to heal.


By New Beginnings Incorporation New Beginnings Transitional Services 20 Dec, 2017

According to the U. S. Department of Defense, about “8,000 military women are assaulted every year.” Medical experts urge Armed forces leaders to reach out to male victims of sexual assault, noting the number of males sexually assaulted in the military is sobering. Approximately “10,800 men are sexually assaulted every year in the military,” however, few military males report being victims of sexual assault.


By New Beginnings Incorporation New Beginnings Transitional Services 20 Dec, 2017

For service men and women returning home, the number of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) suffers is larger than we want to believe. A series of military deployments with a lot of combat-type action, or whether things are noncombat related, the problem can be job-or-finance-related as well as combat-related or personal. A year away from family just creates inherent stress issues. Those afflicted with PSTD can't sleep, are hyper-vigilant and they can become angry very quickly. Please support our work with military and veteran families. Donate today!


By New Beginnings Incorporation New Beginnings Transitional Services 20 Dec, 2017

Learn why Rene Gray joined the military and how there is a lack of opportunity and support from the country to help him deal with his homelessness. Growing up, Gray had to deal with his parents’ divorce and estranged father. Living through these hard times, he decided to try and make ends meet by joining the military.

 Gray came back to the civilian world after serving his time for several years and chose not to reenlist again with the feedback and plea of his family. Although Gray now has a job as a driver and some assistance from social workers, he still finds himself living in a homeless shelter while trying to help support his mother and sister.

 


By New Beginnings Incorporation New Beginnings Transitional Services 20 Dec, 2017

Angela Peacock served in the US Army from 1998-2004, when she was medically retired as a Sergeant after one deployment to Baghdad, Iraq. Thanks to the Veteran Administration treatment and outreach services, Angela is recovering from her ordeal. Angela is currently pursuing a Bachelor’s of Science in Psychology at Washington University in St. Louis with goals to become a Social Worker (MSW) to help other veterans who struggle with PTSD and/or substance abuse and dependence.


By New Beginnings Incorporation New Beginnings Transitional Services 20 Dec, 2017

Tobacco use in the U.S. military is more widespread than among civilian age-related and gender groups. The major challenge to implement tobacco control policies for military members is the long history of a pro-tobacco culture. In a study conducted by Bray et al. (2008-2009), it is “reported that 15% of Department of Defense personnel started smoking after joining the military and that 30% of current smokers reported initiating tobacco use after joining the military.” According to Department of Defense facts, tobacco use costs the military about $1.6 billion annually in healthcare expenses. It is expected to reach nineteen billion dollars in the next 10 years resulting not only in loss productivity, but an increase in medical problems associated with respiratory problems, cardiovascular disease and slower healing.


More Posts
Share by: